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ASFA® and Gymcatch announce strategic partnership

By Fitness business management archives and news, Fitness industry archives and news

The American Sports and Fitness Association® is pleased to announce its new partnership with Gymcatch. By providing great value booking and customer management software for fitness and wellness businesses from $10 per month, ASFA® recognizes Gymcatch’s commitment to making participation easier for all.

As a leading Personal Trainer & Fitness Certification provider, ASFA® recognizes and appreciates the need for companies like Gymcatch who create easy-to-use, affordable tools that help our customers manage their businesses, enabling them to do more of what they do best: bring exercise to their community.  We are delighted to offer our community 20% off their first 12 months on the service with code ASFA20. You can find out more about the service and register here.

Additionally, we are excited to proudly display Gymcatch’s logo on ASFA’s Partner Page with other leaders in the industry such as MyCPR NOW™ – the leading online CPR and First Aid Certification provider, Human Kinetics – the leader in fitness texts and manuals provider, Berxi – a Berkshire Hathaway company and more than 100 gym chains and fitness institutions.

 

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What’s important in your cancellation policy?

By Fitness business management archives and news, Gym and studios, HIIT and group, Pilates, Yoga

If you have been receiving too many ‘I’m sorry I won’t be able to make it today at the very last minute, is time to set a cancellation policy and start protecting your income. Make this task item number one on your to-do list and keep on reading.

“There’s nothing worse than a cancellation” is a phrase we hear quite often at Gymcatch. Although it’s not quite true. Worse than cancellations are last-minute cancellations, and worse still, a no-show.

We’ve all been in that situation where you have prepared for a training session or class and a client cancels at the very last minute. Handling late cancellations and no-shows can be very difficult for your business, eat away precious income and waste the opportunity to get a new face or different client into the session.

Cancellations and no-shows are out of your control but they are bad for business and bad for morale.   What you can do is two things:

1) encourage responsible behaviour of your client base so to minimise cancellations, maximise the notice they give you when they cancel and eradicate no-shows in all  but extreme cases; and

2) mitigate the financial risk of cancellations.

There is a stack of evidence and proven processes which tells us that you can stop cancellations blighting your business. You don’t need to accept a high drop out rate and you shouldn’t.

Take payment at the point of booking

Cancellation rates at businesses where the client pays at the point of booking are 40% lower than at businesses which operate a pay-on-the-door model.

It’s just a fact of human psychology that once a client has paid for something they are far less likely to not show up or cancel it. Some businesses don’t like taking online payments either for reasons of not wanting to pay the card fees or because of additional admin. All the data points to that being a false economy. What you lose in card fees you’ll make back several-fold in reduced and non-refunded, cancellations.

This helps both sides of the cancellation risk: taking payment in advance reduces the number of cancellations and having the client’s money puts you in control of whether your policies allow a refund in the circumstances.

Do I need to let clients cancel at all?

A cancellation is always better than a no-show (because you’ve got a chance of filling the space). Not giving a client the means of cancelling doesn’t stop them from cancelling, it just means they don’t turn up and you won’t know about it in advance.

This is where having a booking software that automates tasks for you, such as booking confirmation messages and reminders, can be very useful and help reduce your no-shows as well as save you time. If you take a proactive approach, you will help minimize no-shows.


Automation of waitlists and refunds

While you can reduce the number of no-shows and cancellations they can’t be eradicated. But encouraging clients to act responsibly and follow a clear process if they need to cancel maximises the chance of you not being out of pocket.

Making it simple to cancel (and receive a refund if it is due) incentivises clients to do this and give you maximum notice.

And for clients who want to take a cancelled space, an instant waitlist which converts to bookings and that is easy to use saves you the bother of phoning round to try and fill a spot.

Do I need a cancellation policy?

Yes, you do. Every business should have a cancellation policy that sets the boundaries of its services. You don’t need to be a lawyer or to copy someone else’s policy. It just needs to very simply and in plain language set the rules that clients need to know when they book.

With this clear, no-surprises, approach a cancellation policy’s role goes beyond protecting your income and also protects your relationship with your client as it stipulates how you work and what your working boundaries are. Most client-provider relationships that break down, do so because of a lack of communication.

Don’t be afraid of making the terms onerous. Strict cancellation policies will encourage good clients to book rather than put them off because it places real value on the place – it demonstrates scarcity and that the client is buying something in demand.

Setting the tone at the very start, for example at sign-up stage will help bring more commitment from the client too. This doesn’t mean that you can’t use your discretion when a client comes to you with some particularly difficult circumstances – you’ve always got that option.

What should I include in a cancellation policy?

  1. Contact information
    How to contact you or your gym or studio. If your client needs to contact you to cancel a session make sure you tell them the process for that. Do you want them to contact you directly, if so how. Or do they need to cancel their booking on your booking system?
  2. Cancellation without penalty?
    Are you going to allow clients to cancel and provide them with a refund, provided they give you sufficient notice?
    Not all businesses do this. Some say that once you’ve booked there are no refunds. Others will always provide a refund no matter when the cancellation comes in. Most businesses fall somewhere in the middle.The whole point of this is to maximise your chance of selling the space that the client is cancelling. If you’re a business with packed waitlists and are regularly over-subscribed and your services are easy to participate in at short notice you can afford to allow cancellations until relatively late. E.g. 48 or 24 hours before the start time.If your session is harder to fill, you don’t have a regular waitlist, or the class is difficult to participate in at short notice then you will probably want the place on sale for longer. E.g. 1 week.We find that cancellation policies which allow refunds up until a few hours before the class start time are counter-productive and see low levels of client uptake on the newly available and more frequent cancellations.at least 24 or 48 hours before. Some will even charge a penalty fee if the 24- or 48-hour timeframe has been breached. If your client has adhered to the timeframe, however, you can give them the option to book into the next session.
  3. Cash refunds or credit
    It’s important to state in your cancellation policy whether you will issue a monetary refund, allow to reschedule or even include a penalty fee.  Offering a refund in the form of a credit to book another session will usually be the better option.  It cheats the revenue in the business, is lighter on admin and acts as a better tool for retention.
  4. Agreement
    When a client makes a booking you’re entering a contract with them so you need to know that you’ve got their agreement. Make sure they read and understood both your cancellation and refund policies. Having your clients tick or sign in the agreement will save any misunderstandings as they’re in clear knowledge of how you operate.

Gymcatch helps you minimise the number of cancellations. Our booking and management system lets you set your cancellation policy to suit your business needs. You can choose to automatically credit customers with a class package that lets them book a replacement class if they give you enough notice. And although cancellations are inevitable and when this happens, our waitlist feature set allows you to fill up the cancelled space fast.

 

 

 

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How to create a referral programme

By Dance, Fitness marketing and social archives and news, Gym and studios, HIIT and group, Pilates, Yoga

A referral programme is a very cost-effective and low risk way to reward your loyal customers for recommending new ones. It’s a very powerful marketing tactic to get existing customers to talk about you and help you acquire new ones.

According to a Nielsen report 83% of people trust their friends’ opinions. Although an old cliché, people buy from people, and that’s because there is immediate confidence and credibility to their testimonial. Led by trust, these future customers have the potential to quickly convert.

In summary, these are the key benefits to a referral programme:

  • Turns customers into loyal ones
  • Helps you build on your testimonials
  • Expands your reach and awareness
  • Converts leads into customers faster

If you are now ready to set up your referral programme and are looking for ideas, this blog is for you, and to make it easy we’ve broken it down into a 4 step guide with inspirational ideas you may want to consider.

  1. Set the goal you want to achieve with your referral programme
    Before you get started, decide on what you want to achieve with your programme. You want this to be clear and measurable. Acquiring new customers may not be your goal or what you want by the end of it. Some businesses will be looking at increasing sales or loyalty to get more advocates and improve on retention. Once you have decided on your goal, think about how you will be measuring progress and what are your referral sources.
  2. Decide on your incentive or reward
    The most successful way to get this right is to encourage insight from your customers to determine what incentive or reward will motivate them. Non-cash incentives such as in-store credits or priority access boost customer retention and sales. You don’t want to spend endless hours tracking and calculating incentives manually. Instead automate as much of this work as possible to save yourself valuable time. Choosing a conversion event, for example, the reward is applicable once the customer has booked a class or session with you and made full payment. This will eliminate any doubts and set the boundaries for when claiming a reward.
  3. Decide on your advocates
    The most critical part of the programme is choosing customers that are as passionate as you are about what you do and know your brand. Share your mission with them and draw some parameters. Work out the tags or hashtags and key messages you want them sharing.

    Consider the following:
    Who do you want to target?
    What do you need them to do?
    How can they achieve this?

  4. Promote your referral programme
    Tell your customers about your programme, chances are they aren’t aware and/or need reminding. Your most loyal customers should be your first place to get started. These are people that love your classes or sessions and have probably already advocated your business more than once before. However, make it easy for your customers to share your services and get rewarded. Social media has become a popular channel to share information and get the word out, but it has to be a simple process for both the referrer and referee, or they will lose interest.

A referral programme creates a win-win situation for all. Your existing clients get rewarded, feel valued, and you get quality leads for new customers. The more customers you get to tell their friends about your classes or appointments the more opportunity for new business you create.

Need inspiration?
Take a look at what some brands are doing!

Uber
Uber’s referral programme has 2 parts. Uber gives drivers and riders a unique referral code to share with friends interested in creating a driver or rider account. When a referral is successful a payment reward is made.
In parallel, they run a user referral programme too that works very similarly. When a user shares their code with a friend and that friend signs up they both get their next trip for free.

Dropbox
Dropbox allows you to earn extra free storage space when you invite friends to try it out. Basic accounts get 500 MB per referral and can earn up to 16GB. Plus accounts get 1 GB and earn up to 32 GB per referral.

How do referrals work on Gymcatch?
There are many ways to use Gymcatch’s features to run a successful referral programme and reward your customers. Our Discount Codes bolt-on, for example, allows customers to invite their friends and family at a fixed amount or percentage off. This is great when wanting to encourage loyalty and improve retention.

You can also use bundles and make them available for purchase for a limited time and remove it from sale at the end of the offer period. These are included as part of the base plan and although mean a little more planning are very easy to set up.

Our own referral programme means customers get rewarded with 2 free months and receive a cash reward when referring a new business. The referred business gets an extra free month directly into their account when registering with us.

For more information on Gymcatch and how it can help your yogapilatesdance or personal training business. Get in contact to book a demo or start a free month.

Why is the right insurance policy essential?

By Uncategorised

Fitness Professionals Ltd (FitPro) gives us the lowdown on choosing insurance that’s right for you.

You have a brilliant booking system, cool client management software and the tools to save you time, increase your revenue and grow your community through Gymcatch. You’re on to a winner. But what happens if the old phrase ‘break a leg’ comes to fruition in one of your classes?

Insurance is an essential string to your bow as a fitness industry professional. It gives you peace of mind. It’s the reassurance that, if the worst were to happen, it is there to assist you and enable you to continue to deliver your classes and sessions.

It’s vitally important to select a highly reliable insurance policy that provides the depth of cover needed to enable you to deliver a range of activities and adapt to the changing demands of the fitness industry. You need to check that the insurance includes cover for the relevant fitness-related activities you’re undertaking, includes worldwide cover if you’re teaching overseas, and is through a reputable insurer.

At FitPro, we’ve been offering instructor public liability insurance protection for over 30 years. We’re continually reviewing our products to ensure they are in line with the needs of fitness industry professionals and the burgeoning industry trends.

Whether you are live-streaming from home, training clients via Zoom, delivering pre-programmed video content, working in gyms, studios and community facilities, working outdoors in parks, gardens and beaches, or mixing it up depending on the weather, the FitPro insurance scheme has you covered. We share tips, advice and information via our social media channels and blogs on an ongoing basis to keep our members up to date with new developments.

The FitPro Instructor Public and Teacher Liability insurance is designed for qualified fitness industry professionals who hold a supporting qualification in their area of instruction, and also for students who are working towards gaining an instructor qualification.

Teaching online

Since 2020, online training has been really big business and, at FitPro, we’re ready to support you with comprehensive insurance.

To be covered for online training, you must:

  • work within your area of knowledge and expertise, supported by a nationally accredited instructor qualification
  • pre-screen participants before each session
  • include a disclaimer
  • follow the appropriate health and safety guidelines
  • ensure that any children/minors participating are supervised throughout the online fitness session by an adult.

You can find out more about FitPro’s cover for online training here.

Suppose the worst happens?

Our customers know that, as long as they are insured with us, we are there to support them. FitPro is committed to providing the most comprehensive cover there is out there. Underwritten by Aviva, the FitPro insurance scheme gives you piece of mind – knowing that one of the UK’s largest insurers stands behind us.

Are you looking for insurance to work in the fitness industry?

See FitPro’s range of insurance schemes available here.

Alternatively, to find out more about FitPro’s insurance policies, speak to a member of our insurance team on 020 8586 8635 or via info@fitpro.com

 

 

 

How to become a dance instructor

By Dance, Fitness business management archives and news

It’s International Dance Day today and what a better way to celebrate than sharing some of my top tips on how to make the jump from dance enthusiast to dance fitness instructor.

Moving towards a new career or class concept armed with rhythm and a desire to make people feel amazing, can seem like a dream come true for many. It was for me over 10 years ago now, when I turned my dancing career into fitness and took the giant leap to become qualified and gain a few group instructor licences under my belt. The journey has come with some challenges, like for most, but I have managed to overcome these and gone onto launch my own business and support hundreds of group instructors with their fitness business.

Here I would like to share my top 5 tips on how to get started with becoming a dance fitness instructor.

1. Find your vibe

There are so many different styles of dance and dance fitness as well as a whole host of teaching methods. If you have a passion for a certain style of dance or music then this will start to pave the way towards a certain brand or creating your own class around a specific theme.

There really is something for everyone in dance fitness – for instructors and participants, which is GREAT because we are all so different with what we love and are truly passionate about helping people stay active.

2. Connect with your clients and potential clients

It might sound basic, but what is your market really looking for? This will help shape how you construct your class if you are going freestyle. If they are after something upbeat with a higher intensity then that will let you know what bpm or movement patterns you might look at. Do they already have experience in dancing? Could this be the first fitness dance class they have ever done? Then that will change what you might add in too. The same goes for branded concepts. Choose something that fits you AND your target market will make it a lot easier to sell as well as to connect with.

3. Make sure you have the right qualifications

Ensure that whatever qualifications you have extend to the concept you wish to cover. The first port of call for someone with no fitness or dance background would be to look at a group exercise qualification. Being qualified in the style of class you want to teach will also help you to pick up cover work at a gym or studio which will help you hit the ground running.

4 Reach out to local instructors

If you are looking to teach but you have no experience, why not attend a variety of classes whilst you work out what it is you truly love. Let the instructor know that you’re intending to train up and they will no doubt be able to point you in the direction of other places to go locally or centres to reach out to that might need extra cover.

5. Think outside of the box

If you’re looking for cover work, then sure, it makes sense to offer a class that’s popular in your local area. But if it’s your own class that you’re looking for, perhaps it would be better to stand out in a busy market than offer the same style or concept. There is something magical about not being afraid to be yourself and teaching a class that makes you feel confident and your clients will feel exactly the same when they connect with you.

If you decide to start a career as a dance instructor, you may want to consider investing in fitness management software like Gymcatch to help you manage your schedule, clients and payments.

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Handling late cancellations for your fitness business

By Fitness business management archives and news, Gym and studios

Throughout my many years managing big-box health clubs and consulting with other fitness businesses of all types, the issue of how to effectively handle cancellations was always top of mind.

Cancellations can be a major hindrance to any fitness business.  The amount of lost revenue that adds up if you’re not properly protected can reach staggering numbers.

But the issue with how to handle cancellations can go deeper than just the loss of revenue.  How you approach the conversation with your members or clients is one of the most critical, yet sensitive topics to have.  So in essence, this isn’t just an accounting issue, it’s also deeply rooted in customer service and speaks to you, your culture, and how you run your business effectively.

How many times has this happened to you… You get up at 5am, throw on some clothes, and get to work just in time for your 6am client. You might arrive a few minutes early and get the chance to check your email when low and behold, at 5:40am there’s an email from your 6am client stating they had to cancel. Great way to start of the day, huh?

This is why it’s critical that you protect yourself and your business with a policy that works. Now depending on what type of business you run and whether it’s a class setting, SGT, one on one training, there can be a lot of variations.  For training clients, typically what I’ve seen work best is a 24-hour cancellation policy – sent from the client to the studio owner, gym owner, or trainer, etc…IN WRITING. Anything less than 24 hours they get charged, simple and straightforward.

For class settings, this can vary widely.  Some businesses provide a window of being able to cancel anywhere from 4 hours up to 10 hours before class without penalty.  If the participant of the class goes past that time frame, I’ve seen a small penalty assessed (anywhere from $5-$20) depending on where you’re located and what is the norm.  Additionally, if it goes past the allowed cancellation time many fitness businesses employ a strict “no-show” policy where the participant is billed $15-$30 (sometimes more).

There are many variations of these policies, but it’s critically important to have one in place. Do not fall victim to the “nice guy” mentality when a client might try and guilt trip you out of charging them.

To go one step further, I did a lot of research through our member base here at the  Fitness Business Association (FBA) and spoke with numerous types of fitness businesses and below are four ways to handle the conversation with clients or class participants.

Make sure, as a business owner yourself, you implement these strategies asap.

  1. “It’s all about setting up expectations from the start. It’s on the bottom of every email I send underneath my signature. If there’s no confusion about the policy, they won’t question it.”
  2. “I say that this policy is in place ‘to protect my time and our instructors’ time’. The most important thing to say though is that judging cancellations on a case-by-case basis would be completely unprofessional and compromise our integrity. Otherwise, your clients will think you will make a special exception for them because their situation is special.”
  3. “Here is a rough outline of what I say to clients. Sometimes I soften it up if I’m talking to clients I know well…As you know, we have a 24-hour cancellation policy here for all training sessions so you will be charged for the session you missed today. I set time aside and prepare for each appointment I have and I’m only paid for the appointments that I complete, so, this policy is in place to protect my time. Judging cancellations on a case-by-case basis would be completely unprofessional so I apply the policy uniformly and fairy to all my clients. I’m sure you can understand how important this is in terms of protecting my professional integrity.”
  4. “In an attempt to be as understanding and flexible as possible, I always allow my clients to make up this session within the week that they canceled if there is a time that works conveniently for both our schedules. So let me know if and when you would be free to make it up. Thanks for your understanding”

As you can see from the above examples, it’s a sensitive topic that should be handled with care.  The last thing you want is to make your client feel embarrassed at any point in time.  You never want these types of conversations to happen in public and should always be handled privately.

Remember, whether you’re training in your home, at a studio or gym, if you run your own studio, gym, or club – you are a business and you need to protect your business.  It’s never too late to integrate one of these policies into your business.

 

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How to thrive as a personal trainer: What’s your niche?

By Fitness business management archives and news, Gym and studios

How do you ensure your job as a personal trainer is benefitting your clients and is highly rewarding for you, too? Here, FitPro, the largest organisation in the UK for fitness professionals, dives deep into how you can thrive – and not just survive – as a personal trainer.

Personal training is a career of early starts and late finishes. Let’s face it: it’s not just a job, it’s a lifestyle. It’s not unheard of for 50 hours spent at the gym to translate into 25 hours of actual personal training – there are often gaps between clients, even if you’re a whizz with the scheduling.

However, a savvy personal trainer will use this time well, getting the admin and client programming done and performing their own workouts. After all, personal training is a strenuous business. PTs must be robust and comfortable being on their feet all day, providing demonstrations of technique, which requires a lot of practice. Not to mention being sociable and energetic all day!

To be a successful personal trainer, you need to gain the right qualifications. Most courses begin with a Gym Instructor (Level 2) qualification, which gives you the basics, before moving on to the Personal Trainer (Level 3) qualification to upgrade your knowledge and coaching skills so you can work with people on a one-to-one basis. There are also specialist qualifications, some of which we will mention here. You also need to be insured, which is a legal requirement for a personal trainer.

So, let’s discover which type of personal trainer you are and how you can thrive in your chosen specialism.

There are many niches to explore as a personal trainer. If you can discern early on what type of coach you’d like to be – for example, working with special populations, athletes or aspiring beach bodies – you can concentrate on building a strong business model with specific skillsets gained through qualifications, plus a solid understanding of the area you’d like to work in. Let’s take a look at a few of those areas here and how you can thrive in them:

1. Special populations

Special populations are diverse. You may choose to work with pre- or postnatal women to facilitate a healthy birth, pregnancy and start to motherhood, or you may work with children to encourage a lifelong love of exercise. Perhaps providing disabled people with training opportunities that support a healthy life is what moves you, or you may choose to work with the ageing population, helping elderly people to enjoy activity in their later years and reap the benefits it brings. Alternatively, you may wish to support those who have been ill or injured, working on a referral basis with other professionals to help clients return to doing things they enjoy. Each avenue offers unique challenges for you.

To thrive as a special population’s personal trainer, you should:

  • meet your client where they are – at their current level of ability – while planning progressive, smart training programmes to aid their development
  • build trust – being patient, a great communicator and having the ability to inspire will help you to build trust with your client
  • know your onions when it comes to your client’s specialist area. Do your homework – but don’t overstep the mark. Refer back to other professionals if you need to
  • build a support network around yourself – having other health professionals you trust and can refer out to gives your client a wider scope of treatments and solutions.

Useful qualifications for a personal trainer working with special populations include Level 3 Exercise Referral; FAI; ViPR Active Ageing; ViPR Kids; and Pre- and Postnatal.

2. Sports specific

Whether you work with elite, semi-professional or recreational athletes, as a sports-specific PT you will be tasked with finding the margins that help make the difference between winning and losing. You’ll need to work well with other team members, such as coaches, managers and physios, to collectively create the ultimate grounding for success.

To thrive as a sports-specific PT, you should:

  • support your client to fulfil their athletic potential, strengthening movement patterns and energy systems that are particular to the sport and athlete
  • be able to work in conjunction with other professionals to create a team around the athlete
  • perform a lot of research into the specific sport you will be coaching athletes for, along with its movement and energy requirements
  • remain up to date with the latest scientific research
  • learn the skill of planning training blocks to work with the sporting calendar and competition needs
  • build trust and rapport with your athlete to create a successful programme.

Useful qualifications for a sports-specific personal trainer include strength and conditioning courses; Olympic weightlifting courses; and SAQ courses.

3. Body transformation

The primary goal of a body transformation PT is to help their clients look better. However, achieving aesthetic goals also increases people’s confidence, self-esteem and self-worth, as well as improves fitness and health. Achieving a weight-loss goal may also help a client to feel mentally stronger and improve classic health markers, such as the risk of heart problems and diabetes.

Once clients achieve their targets, body transformation coaches can progress their clients’ achievements further, for example, building and sculpting muscle or reducing body fat.

To thrive as a body transformation PT, you should:

  • understand muscle anatomy, and how to isolate and train target groups in a variety of different ways
  • understand metabolism and how to provide clients with the best nutrition plans to achieve the transformation
  • help and support clients to change their behaviours so they can make long-term, sustainable changes
  • be brilliant at motivation, to enable clients to remain engaged with their programme
  • be able to market yourself in a visual way to demonstrate the outcomes your programmes can achieve.

Useful qualifications for a body transformation PT include nutrition courses; behaviour change courses; and weight management courses.

4. Health and performance

Working as a health and performance personal trainer is great for those who want to help improve their clients’ health and fitness, feel stronger and fitter, move better and enjoy a more active lifestyle (often without pain or discomfort) – from playing with the grandkids to getting outside for long hikes and everything in between. Health and performance PTs will also work with clients who are recovering from injury or illness and feel they need some extra help to get them to where they want to be.

To thrive as a health and performance PT, you should:

  • understand human movement and, therefore, be able to identify and address movements and systems that require improving
  • be able to progress and regress exercises in creative ways to suit the needs of each individual client – one size does not fit all – finding bespoke ways to help clients overcome their barriers with confidence
  • bring a fun element to your functional training
  • be able to communicate with clients honestly and clearly, explaining the complexities of the human body in a way a client can understand.

Useful qualifications for an HPC include Biomechanics Method; Pain-Free Movement Specialist; ViPR LMT1 and 2.

Whatever your choice of specialism as a PT, it’s important to keep moving forward, adding to your skillset and reviewing your knowledge. Read more about FitPro’s courses here.

 

 

 

 

Personal trainer

Switching to Gymcatch: some answers to common questions

By Fitness business management archives and news

Switching to Gymcatch is super easy for both; you and your customers. We have helped many fitness professionals make the switch with ease so that they can do more of what they love. Here are some of the most common questions we get asked. 

I don’t want to pay for two systems at once. When do I start paying?

Gymcatch is free for the first month so you have a full month to transition from your old system. If you need longer to transition, just speak to our team who will be able to help you. We don’t want you to be paying until you’re ready!

Is it easy to move my clients over to switch?

Yes we make it easy for you to import your client base, to create accounts for your clients and for clients to create their own accounts and find you on Gymcatch.  Switching to Gymatch is super easy, there are step by step guides for whichever route you want to use.

Do you have support?

Yes we have live support during office hours and you can book an appointment with our team at any time.

If clients have pre-paid on my old system, can this be reflected in Gymcatch?

Yes, if you have clients who have bought memberships or blocks (or any other product) from you, you can add the equivalent product to their account on Gymcatch. Then when they log in, they’ll see that service there.

How long does it take to set up my Gymcatch account?

Setting up on Gymcatch can take as little as few minutes depending on how the complexity of your business model. If you have a busy schedule and lots of different pricing structures it will take a little longer but even the most complex businesses should be up and running in an hour or so. And if there’s anything you’re struggling with we have set guides for all our features, and a support team ready to take your questions.

How can Gymcatch do what I need for so much less than my old system?

We’ve got a different business model to many of our competitors. We’re priced so that basically any independent fitness and wellness business can afford to use us. So we cost between £10 and £24 / month with no additional costs.

We would rather have more customers paying less whereas more expensive systems concentrate on serving a smaller number of businesses who can pay more.

We don’t compromise on core functionality though. So you get native mobile apps and all the core features an independent fitness and wellness business needs.

But what we don’t offer are features that only a small percentage of our customers will use. But for the core features for you and your clients that has everything you need – we’ve got it covered.

So our pricing isn’t a catch with either an inferior service or hidden charges down the road, we just want to keep our prices low and serve a bigger part of the industry.

What if I decide Gymcatch isn’t for me?

First of all we’d recommend giving it time. We don’t necessarily do everything exactly as you are used to and exactly like your previous system does. Sometimes we find that clients don’t realise just how much functionality Gymcatch has when they can’t see it straight away. So check our feature demos and with our support team who can help.

If after all, though, you decided Gymcatch isn’t the right fit for you, then you can cancel any time. There’s no tie-in or minimum contract left.

Ready to switch? Let us help you run your business! Gymcatch is free for the first month so you can test all its features and functionality. Start saving time, money and increase your revenue!

 

In-person fitness class

How to price your in-person fitness classes

By Fitness business management archives and news, HIIT and group

Pricing your in-person fitness classes is probably one of the most difficult decisions you have had to make for your business. Here, personal trainer, Anna Martin shares her top tips on setting your prices right.

Know your area and your target market
Every area has a price ceiling. This is going to differ depending on where you are and your local demographics. So it’s important to benchmark your price against other local fitness providers. The closer the service the better the comparison.

For example, while you can compare the price of small group training at a gym to the price of a dance fitness class, you have acknowledged that it’s a different experience and market and the client’s willingness to pay will differ. It’s important to understand what’s driving fitness consumers’ decisions to buy your services.

Most of us want to charge a fair price: provide a great service that offers the client value, but which also makes us feel valued, appreciated, and attributing a price to your own effort, skills and experience.

Within reason, price is not among the primary factors when clients are buying fitness. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that as long as you’re cheap, you’ll get full classes.

Value your skills, education and experience
If you’ve been teaching for a while, you have accumulated a set of skills. Those skills are a combination of the education earned as well as the experience you’ve gained from all the days in the trenches helping different bodies stay fit and well.

This should be considered when setting up your prices. Just because someone locally is charging less than you, don’t feel you need to price match. If you’re offering something better, charge more!

Likewise, if you are supplying quality equipment to do the class you should charge for that (and make sure your clients know they are getting the best kit). Similarly, if you are providing a service that is capacity-constrained, and therefore are restricted on numbers, that will probably also mean that you will need to increase the class price.

Don’t be embarrassed at increasing your pricing for your fitness classes. You’re not ripping-off customers: if you’re providing a quality product your client base will have no problem paying a proper price for it.

Keep a close eye on your overheads
Work out what you need to make from that class in order to make it worth you doing it (after all you have bills to pay too) and then calculate any per head or per hour cost that you may need to charge in order to make it profitable.

Include all your overheads too. Your travel, your admin time, your client support outside of the class, marketing, insurance, licenses etc.: it’s not just the hire of the venue and the time spent at the front of the class which your clients need to pay for.

One of the worst things you can do is to go in too low because you’re scared to ask for more. It breeds resentment and it’s also self-defeating. And that is the LAST emotion you want to have walking into a room full of people who are there waiting for you to bring the magic.

Your prices will go up, this is a fact of life. You can’t make yourself immune from inflation.

From experience, most price increases in group exercise happen when we need to, not because we would like to. It is unlikely that your price increase isn’t fair, one of the few drawbacks in this industry is that we tend to undersell ourselves when we should value ourselves more.

Increasing your prices is just a matter of good communication. Let them know face to face that it’s going to happen and then email them, giving them plenty of notice (as in weeks or even 1-2 months rather than days). But don’t make a big deal of it.

Make sure everyone knows in a thorough way, let them know when the prices will increase and to what, then move on. What you don’t want or need is spending months or weeks talking about your prices.

It’s a distraction and it’s boring and it’s not what your clients are paying for. You might lose the odd client. But it’s far better to lose the odd client at your new price than hang on to those clients charging an unsustainable amount.

Keep things simple
A common mistake that fitness instructors make is to create overly complicated pricing structures, often to try and be all things to all people. This is often self-defeating.

While lots of us are creatures of habit and show a bit of reluctance to change, you should not tie yourself to running your business in a way you don’t want to, just because you are worried about changing things up for certain clients.

Communicate clearly, explain why you need to change the way you run your business and your clients will understand and change. Spare yourself, bespoke pricing, making bookings for people, bank transfers etc. Advertise a fair, simple, and transparent price structure and ask clients to get onboard.

If you don’t give them a choice they will. If you are timid and do give them a choice, people will instinctively want to stick to what they know. That’s not because the way they do it is better, it’s just because it’s what they are used to and they don’t like change!

Lastly, now that you have worked out the right pricing for your fitness classes is time to think about your lead generation strategy and how to get more customers through the door.

For more information on Gymcatch and how it can help your yogapilatesdance or personal training business. Get in contact to book a demo or start a free month.

International Women's Day

International Women’s Day fitness heroes

By Fitness marketing and social archives and news

International Women’s Day is a great excuse for us to pay tribute to the women empowering other women through fitness and wellness. Our fitness and wellness heroes come from all over the world, they lead, influence and inspire in different ways, but the one thing they have in common is that special ability to motivate others.

This years’ International Women’s Day campaign #BreakTheBias celebrates a world free of bias, stereotypes, and discrimination.

We’ve gathered some of our favourite fitness and wellness heroes for you who live and inspire by doing it their way.

  1. Kayla Itsines

Kayla is an Australian Personal trainer, co-founder of @SWEAT and creator of the Bikini Body Guide (#BBG). She has made a name for herself in the fitness industry with championing body positivity and the release of #BBG, a 12-week programme with its own hashtag.

Her SWEAT app alone has amassed over 30 million downloads according to Techcrunch with over a million people using it on a monthly basis.

Kayla joined the body positivity movement very early on helping women recognise that everyone is unique and that there is more than one path to health and happiness.  She has been helping millions make health and fitness a part of their life and currently has one of the largest fitness communities out there.

  1. Brittne Babe

Former track athlete and now queen of home workouts, Brittne has helped thousands of women with her no excuses approach. In the past 10 years in industry, Brittne has partnered with STRONG by Zumba, Gymshark and Women’s Best to name a few. She launched an online 21 Day Challenge and the Brittcamp.

Brittne is an influencer who has gained her name due to her very impressive fitness skills. She showcases this well on her YouTube channel giving tons of inspiration for easy-to-do yet effective home workouts.

  1. Natacha Oceane

Youtuber and fitness influencer from London, Natacha has made a name for herself with the release of her science-based training guide, CUT, which has become very popular among her followers. She has now released 4 guides since.

Natacha makes plyometrics look super easy and shares her training routine including recipes, daily. The combination of her exercises has many benefits such as stimulating metabolism and increasing strength.

Last May Natacha donated all her May’s YouTube ad revenue to support causes fighting racism.

  1. Davina McCall

Former Big Brother UK presenter, Davina has been showing off her age-defying body across social channels with workout videos and recipe ideas. Her goal is to encourage everyone in the UK to be healthier and more active whilst having fun.

Over the past few years, Davina has become a UK fitness influencer and has gone to launch Own Your Goals. Most recently she announced a partnership with @Actionmedres for her charity ride Davina’s Big Sussex Bike Ride this July, raising money for sick babies and children.

  1. Cassey Ho

Creator of Pop Pilates, a fusion workout consisting of highly-focused movements, Cassey has helped over 5m people transform their bodies online. These days Pop Pilates has become a global sensation and has one of the largest fitness communities out there.

Her mission to get people stronger hasn’t changed since she launched her YouTube channel and she has been claimed to modernise Pilates, making it truly accessible to everyone following her.

  1. Cat Meffan

Ex-gymnast and dancer now turned yoga teacher, Cat first launched a fitness and travel blog named Imperfect Matter before launching My Soul Sanctuary. My Soul Sanctuary is a platform to inspire yoga practice and personal growth where she shares daily affirmations or mantras and yoga poses.

She has had collaborations with some big fitness brands including Nike, Sweaty Betty and Zico Coconut Water.

  1. Tara Mia Simich

Founder of The Jungle Body a global movement-to-music company offering a range of soul-igniting and beat-driven fitness programmes for everyone in 20 countries around the globe. Tara became addicted to group fitness whilst living in New York and attending fitness classes. On her return to Australia, she was determined to create a fun and sweat workout programme and Konga was born.  A total of eight programmes have since then been created The Jungle Body’s mission is to empower women to feel good about themselves.

  1. Rachael Brathen

Originally from Sweden, Rachael attended her first meditation retreat at age 18. From there she continued visiting yoga studios very week looking to get rid of some the begative memories from childhood.

She then went on to found in 2010 the Yoga Girl®. A movement looking to provide support for healing and expand self-love. The Yoga Girl culture is to allow each person to be who they truly are and it has now a vast community of dedicated practitioners from all over the world.

  1. Charlee Atkins

Charlee is a New York City-based fitness expert, certified by both ‘Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist’ and ‘Certified Functional Strength Coach’. Her time at SoulCycle led her to set up Le Sweat, and what initially started as a fitness blog quickly evolved into a community of fitness enthusiasts.

She inspires thousands of people to move daily through motivational posts and informational videos. In 2020 she launched Le Sweat app TV.

She has been featured in top magazines such as Women’s Health, Cosmopolitan and Men’s Health.

  1. Wendy Ida

Wendy pushes the standard to prove that age is just a number. At 65 years old she holds two Guinness World Records, one for the Oldest Active Instructor and the other for the most burpees in one minute, a whopping 37.

However, Wendy didn’t start her fitness journey until she reached 43 years of age in a quest to lose weight and overcome a past abusive relationship. Today she holds an incredible record with top awards at NPC Body Building and Figure Championships.

  1. Svava Sigbertsdottir

Icelandic-born Svava is an advocate that if you want things to happen, you must step up and make it happen. She released The Viking Method after trying many different fitness concepts and realising that a combination of them all would give her the lean tight body she was after.

For Svava however is not about looking a certain way but rather feeling confident, powerful, agile, strong and quick. A bold warrior at heart, Svava brings her Viking roots to her training and encourages people everywhere to show up for themselves.

  1. Brooke Siler Pilates

Author of The New York Times’ best-seller The Pilates Body and creator of Tensatoner™️. Fitness trainer to the stars include supermodels Kate Moss, Liv Tyler and Amber Valetta.

Brooke is at the forefront of the Pilates community having trained with protégée Romana Kryzanowska at Drago’s Gym in New York.

  1. Nadia Alkoc

Zumba®️Jammer and personal trainer, Nadia brings great energy to her social media accounts with her vibrant style flying the flag for all Zumba enthusiasts in Scotland and beyond.

  1. Claire Burlison

Founder of one of the biggest fitness concepts in the UK, Clubbercise a dance class with neon lights and uplifting club anthems.  Claire set up her business in 2013 and what started with 2 friends now has around 100,000 people train every week to the biggest and best dance tunes.

Claire is an inspiration to all those women out there who start a business from scratch and have the vision and determination to make it a success.

  1. Rachel Holmes

Group fitness educator and presenter, choreographer, coach and mentor. With over 30 years in the fitness industry, Rachel helps fitness professionals build a successful business and teach amazing fitness classes. Rachel has released over 50 instructional DVDs and many fitness programs for the fitness industry.

Rachel’s extensive knowledge in both the applicable fitness world and the operational aspect of growing a business means that she can be a valuable resource for anyone looking for the next steps.

For more information on Gymcatch and how it can help your yogapilatesdance or personal training business. Get in contact to book a demo or start a free month.

 

 

 

 

 

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